Monthly Archives: July, 2019

Unacceptable workplace behaviors’ at UNICEF, leaked report summary says

July 8th, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

Source: Devex.com

 

UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. Children’s Fund’s workplace is not living up to the organization’s values of empowering children and families, according to UNICEF’s internal summary of a forthcoming independent task force report.

“While the draft ITF [independent task force] report found that there was a high level of pride among UNICEF staff in working for the organization, it also revealed that there is an environment of ‘results at all costs’ where staff feel that offenses go unpunished,” Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, deputy executive director of partnerships at UNICEF, wrote in a May 27 letter sent to staff along with the internal summary, both of which were obtained by Devex.

“The Task Force finds that there are groups of staff who still feel strongly that they are victims of an ‘us and them’ culture.”

— UNICEF internal summary of the draft report

“The draft report states that dysfunctional support from systems designed to provide checks and balances on the exercise of authority has led to increased stress, frustration among staff, resulting in worrying low-levels of trust in management,” the letter continues. MORE

Harassment widespread in workplaces, finds Statistics Canada

July 8th, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

A recent report adds to a growing body of evidence showing harassment in Canadian workplaces is in need of workplace interventions and regulatory enforcement.

Conducted by Statistics Canada this report, using survey data from 9,000 respondents living in the 10 provinces aged 15 to 64 who worked for pay in 2016, found almost one in five women had been harassed at work at some point during the year while one in every eight men reported similar experiences.

For the purposes of this survey, harassment included verbal abuse, humiliating behaviour, threats, violence and unwanted sexual attention or harassment.

Women report more abuse

Verbal abuse was experienced most often with 13 per cent of women and 10 per cent of men reporting it in the prior 12 months. Next most prevalent was humiliating behaviour reported by six per cent of women and five per cent of men.

Women were found to suffer physical violence at twice the rate of men and five times as likely to report sexual harassment or unwanted sexual attention—this last point echoing prior research. For women, being young, single or unmarried was found to add to sexual harassment vulnerability. Researchers suggest these characteristics may be “proxies for less seniority at work and poor job quality—factors that may increase the likelihood of experiencing sexual harassment in the workplace to the extent that they imply low organizational power.”

Harassment was more pronounced among women and men who identified as homosexual or bisexual compared to heterosexuals. Excess suffering was also experienced by aboriginal compared to non-aboriginal women.

The survey also found clients, customers, supervisors and managers were the most common reported source of harassment. Not surprising then women and men employed in sectors involving direct contact with the public report the most harassment with health occupations leading the way—again echoing prior research. In this sector, 27 per cent of women and 21 per cent of men indicated they had suffered harassment in the last year.

Beyond the immediate source of harassment, Stats Can researchers looked at the association between workplace harassment and work environment. Surveyed workers reported several factors indicating a poor-quality work environment, including a lack of input into decision making, competition among colleagues, conflict with managers, and unmanageable workloads. A full 40 per cent of women for instance reported rarely or never experiencing manageable workloads. By way of explaining their reasons for pursuing these factors in the survey, the researchers observed, “Previous research suggests that the psychosocial quality of the work environment is an important determinant of workplace harassment.”

Employer obligations

Recognized as a global workplace problem, the International Labour Organization recently passed a convention recognizing harassment and violence “can constitute a human rights violation or abuse…is a threat to equal opportunities, is unacceptable and incompatible with decent work.” It serves as a reminder for member states, including Canada, they have a responsibility to promote a “general environment of zero tolerance.”

Here in Ontario, employers have legal obligations to address the issue of workplace harassment and violence pursuant to Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA). Chief among these obligations is the requirement to develop a workplace harassment policy (in addition to a workplace violence policy). Employers must also develop a harassment program, which includes measures and procedures for workers to report incidents and how they will be investigated and addressed. Unfortunately, unlike the violence program requirements, OSHA has no specific requirement for the prevention of harassment — an omission many health and safety activists say must be amended. Regardless, employers must provide all workers with information and instruction on the content of the workplace harassment (and violence) policy and program.

Data recently obtained by the Globe and Mail show more than 3,500 Ontario employers were cited for violating these violence and harassment obligationsover an 18 month period ending January, 2018.

Though, this Statistics Canada survey and other research suggest non-compliance is even more common with worker representatives calling for “meaningful and consistent enforcement” of these laws and Criminal Code provisions.

Legal implications outside the scope of the OHSA can also be costly. In February, 2019, Ontario Superior Court awarded nearly $200,000 in damagesto a worker who alleged suffering abuse and harassment and had informed the employer on more than one occasion and asked for intervention. The employer ignored the request.

Employers also face financial costs for absenteeism, presenteeism, turnover and lower productivity related to the stress and mental health outcomes of harassment at work.

 

Source: WHSC.COM

Ottawa-area priest found guilty of sexually abusing boys in 1960s and '70s

Ottawa-area priest found guilty of sexually abusing boys in 1960s and ’70s

July 8th, 2019 General News

Source:

An Ottawa-area priest preyed on vulnerable teens, luring them with sports and alcohol as he gratified his sexual desires, an Ontario court said last week in finding him guilty of sexual assault-related charges linked to incidents in the 1960s and ’70s.

In 2017, William McGrory was charged with indecent assault and gross indecency — outdated offences that no longer exist in the Criminal Code — in connection with three complainants, but court documents say one of them died, prompting two counts of the offences to be dropped.

McGrory pleaded not guilty and his lawyers argued that his accusers, identified only as J.B. and R.G., were not credible because there were inconsistencies in their accounts.

During a seven-day trial before a judge alone that began in April, court heard the boys, now in their 60s, had difficult family situations and grew close to McGrory, who was involved in church youth groups. The priest would play football and hockey with them, then drink alcohol with them afterward, court heard.

He would also invite boys to visit him at his rectory in Richmond, Ont., to do chores or watch sports, court heard. It was there that McGrory sexually abused them, though one of the complainants said it also happened at his home, court heard. MORE

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