Posts in Respect in the Workplace

workplace harassment

Emerging Themes in Workplace Psychological Safety 2021

August 6th, 2021 Research, Respect in the Workplace

 

Workplace Harassment During the Pandemic

Despite expectations that workplace harassment might have decreased during the pandemic as many organizations shifted to working remotely, new research suggests the opposite. A survey led by Project Include, who advocate for diversity and inclusion efforts in the technology industry, found that: 

 

  • 25% of respondents reported an increase in gender-based harassment
  • 10% reported increases in race or ethnicity-based harassment
  • 23% of respondents aged 50 or older experienced an increase in age-related harassment 
  • And those most likely to experience harassment identified as Black, Asian, Latinx, Indigenous, female, and/or nonbinary (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). 

 

These behaviours have also taken on new forms, ranging from individual to group-based bullying, harassment, and discrimination, experienced over video calls, emails, and workplace chat spaces (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). 

 

This increase in gender-based harassment has also been found in research led by The Purple Campaign, who advocate for ending workplace harassment. Recent findings showed that 25% of employees surveyed also experienced an increase in gender-based harassment throughout the pandemic (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). 

 

Possible reasons for this increase in harassment include changes in the ways we communicate and our working environments. With more one-on-one communication occurring in isolation and the lines between work and home environments being blurred, employees may act or speak in ways that are much more casual and informal than they normally would in physical work spaces (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). 

 

To address these challenges, organizational leaders should clearly communicate to their employees that the same rules around psychological safety and professionalism apply in any type of work space, whether in the office or working from home (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). Establishing specific guidelines for video meetings, including the type of commentary in chats, having cameras and microphones on or off during meetings, and where meetings take place (for example, requiring a dedicated workspace with a professional background) can help to set a clear understanding for all employees (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). Establishing anonymous reporting systems, such as Whistleblower Hotlines, are one way to provide safe ways and mechanisms for employees to report harassment and other harmful behaviours. 

 

Providing all staff with anti-harassment training, such as the Respect in the Workplace program, can help open the lines of communication between managers and employees and create a shared set of standards for organizations as a whole (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). Finally, for this training to be effective, it should come from a lens of preparing managers and employees to act as bystanders when witnessing harassment or other harmful behaviours, instead of approaching them as either victims or aggressors in these situations (Rabasca Roepe, 2021). 

 

The Link Between Workplace Psychological Well-Being & Depression

 

New research has shown that full-time workers in organizations that don’t prioritize employee mental health have three times the risk of being diagnosed with depression (University of South Australia, 2021). The year-long study led by the University of South Australia’s Psychosocial Safety Climate Observatory, the world’s first research platform focusing on psychological health and safety in the workplace, also found that poor workplace mental health can be traced back to poor management practices (University of South Australia, 2021). If employee well-being is not prioritized and valued by organizations, these management practices can include high job demands and low resource availability, including working long hours, not rewarding or acknowledging hard work, unreasonable demands and expectations for workers, and a lack of autonomy in the workplace (University of South Australia, 2021). Along with higher rates of depression, increased levels of burnout and workplace bullying were also found within organizations that failed to support employee mental health (University of South Australia, 2021). 

 

The researchers used the term psychological safety climate (PSC) to describe the practices used by management, including communication and participation systems, that protect the health and safety of employees (University of South Australia, 2021). Other studies have found that low PSC is an important predictor of emotional exhaustion and bullying (University of South Australia, 2021). Low PSC can result in increased employee stress; in turn, this can trigger bullying, which impacts all employees involved both directly and indirectly, often leading to higher rates of exhaustion and burnout (University of South Australia, 2021). 

 

Low PSC is often found in companies that do not consult with employees and unions over workplace health and safety and those who provide little support for stress prevention (University of South Australia, 2021). Further, bullying can be both predicted and prevented, depending on a company’s level of PSC and commitment to employee mental health (University of South Australia, 2021). With the impacts of low PSC resulting in absenteeism, poor engagement in the workplace, more stress leaves and lower productivity, investing in your psychological safety climate benefits both the social and economic health of your organization (University of South Australia, 2021). 

 

Emotional Literacy as a Tool for Psychologically Safe Leaders

 

Emotional literacy, or the ability to recognize and responsibly manage emotions, is one of the key skills held by psychologically safe leaders (Howatt & Winters, 2021). Leaders with high emotional literacy understand and care about how their and others’ behaviour impacts their colleagues and can manage their emotions under pressure (Howatt & Winters, 2021). A major challenge to emotional literacy is learning to navigate unpleasant, negative emotions proactively instead of reactively (Howatt & Winters, 2021). Understanding that emotions themselves are not the problem, but how they are handled, leaders who can manage difficult emotions effectively are well poised to support their teams through challenges (Howatt & Winters, 2021). Emotional literacy has no doubt benefitted leaders throughout the pandemic, as organizations and employees navigated unprecedented circumstances and ongoing changes to daily routines.

 

Four skills leaders can focus on to develop their emotional literacy include:

 

1. Increasing your self-awareness to better know and acknowledge your feelings.

Rather than just knowing your emotions, recognize why you might be feeling them and how your reaction to these emotions might impact others, both positively and negatively (Howatt & Winters, 2021).

 

2. Manage your initial reaction.

Negative emotions can and will happen, but you have a choice in how you react. If your immediate reaction is guided by negative emotions, this can often lead to worse situations or outcomes (Howatt & Winters, 2021).

 

3. Lean into and show empathy.

Empathy, or the ability to understand and share in your employee’s emotions, is a crucial skill for psychologically safe leaders. Beyond what employees are saying, their body language and tone are important cues to recognize how they are feeling (Howatt & Winters, 2021).


4. Recognize your mistakes and repair hurt feelings.

Psychologically safe leaders are able to admit when they are wrong and have made a mistake. Mistakes will happen, and authentic efforts to repair hurt feelings and acknowledge missteps are important habits for leaders to develop (Howatt & Winters, 2021). 

 

References: 

Howatt, B., and Winters, T. (2021, July 21). Emotional literacy is a core competency for psychologically safe leaders. Occupational Health & Safety Canada. Retrieved from https://www.ohscanada.com/features/emotional-literacy-is-a-core-competency-for-psychologically-safe-leaders/ 

Rabasca Roepe, L. (2021, July 19). Why workplace harassment increased during the pandemic. Fast Company. Retrieved from https://www.fastcompany.com/90655155/why-workplace-harassment-increased-during-the-pandemic 

University of South Australia. (2021, June 24). Companies who pay scant attention to workers’ psychological health leave employees at higher risk of depression. Retrieved from https://www.unisa.edu.au/media-centre/Releases/2021/companies-who-pay-scant-attention-to-workers-psychological-health-leave-employees-at-higher-risk-of-depression/ 

Podcast with Sheldon Kennedy – The Boiling Point

July 28th, 2020 Respect in the Workplace, Sheldon Kennedy

This podcast features a powerful conversation between Dave Veale, Dr. Bill Howatt and Sheldon Kennedy. Thank you to The Boiling Point for this great opportunity!

PODCAST: TIME TO STOP BULLYING WITH RESPECT IN THE WORKPLACE

“Sheldon Kennedy, former NHL player and long time advocate of Respect in the Workplace and Respect in Sport, shares his journey helping to educate people and build awareness.

Having Sheldon Kennedy join us for an episode of Shifting the Employee Experience helped us to solidify a point we’ve been hearing throughout this partnership project, which is that in order to start prioritizing #mentalhealth and #mentalwellbeing in the workplace, we need to start talking.

Sheldon and his work with Respect Group have shown what can happen when we all start speaking out about our experiences and start to have these sometimes difficult conversations. Make sure you listen to his episode to hear even more about steps you can take along your path to Shift the Employee Experience.”

Click here to listen to this amazing podcast.

About The Boiling Point Podcast:

“Hosted by Greg & Dave, these thought-provoking interviews with entrepreneurs, thought leaders and movement makers revolve around the experiences and the moments that shaped their careers. Get inspired by these adventurous business leaders who are doing good, being sustainable, achieving work-life balance, promoting a healthy lifestyle and more. Get great advice on the next steps you can take in your business, career and life. Our show – a “must listen podcast” according to Workopolis and the Dragon’s Den – is meant to inform and spark positive change in business and the world.”

Working from home: Tips from our team!

April 24th, 2020 Respect in the Workplace

For the past weeks we’ve been wondering, how can we help during this crisis? Since our team has been working entirely from home for the past 16 years, we wanted to share our best tips with you!

Whether working from home is new to you or you are trying to adjust to unprecedented changes in your current remote workspace, we hope our tips can provide some support.

 

Working from home: 3 tips for employees

 

1.Take control of the flexibility
Embrace the opportunities of an unstructured day but make sure to stick to a schedule that will keep you accountable and successful.

2. Schedule your breaks and make them count
If you are taking a break make sure it gives you the refresh that you need. Get outside, connect with someone or find whatever it is that gets you re-energized!

3. Create a dedicated workspace
Make a clear transition from homelife to work time to help reduce distractions and create boundaries.

*Don’t forget to be easy on yourself, this transition takes time!

 

Working from home: 3 tips for employers

 

1. TRUST each other
As an employer, it helps if you have trust and that works both ways.

2. Share positive occurrences
Establish an internal communication network where positive occurrences can be shared across the team.

3. Encourage interaction and collaboration
Find what works best for your team to make communication easy and consistent. There are endless options out there (Skype, HangOuts, Go To Meetings, email, phone calls, etc…) and using more than one can be helpful.

Respect Group/Workplace Fairness Institute Action Summit 2020

February 3rd, 2020 Respect in the Workplace

The Action Summit 2020 was a success! 

We had some great conversations exploring the intersection of Psychological Health & Safety and Civility & Respect!

Thanks to our moderator Blaine Donais and experts Dr. Pat Ferris, Cam Mitchell and Wayne McNeil. 

Thanks to all of our brilliant speakers.

Thank you to The GRAND for hosting our Action Summit.

And most of all, we want to thank everyone who participated to the event and made it a success! 

 

Respect Group/Workplace Fairness Institute Action Summit

January 5th, 2020 Respect in the Workplace

Is your organization at a loss as how to address psychological health and safety or challenged with Alberta’s new Occupation Health and Safety code?  We are bringing support.  Join us for the day to get insight into this complex issue and take away real tools you can immediately apply in your workplace.

Our upcoming Action Summit will examine the intersection of Psychological Health and Safety and Civility & Respect.  You won’t want to miss it so join us on January 29th, 2020.

Attention HR professionals: Earn 6 CPD Hours by attending the Action Summit!

Get Your Tickets HERE

Summit Developers

The Workplace Fairness Institute and Respect Group

 

As partners, the Workplace Fairness Institute and Workplace Fairness West believe that psychological health and safety is AS important as physical health and safety.  That is why we support organizations across Canada to create working environments in which employees can thrive. Whether that’s promoting civility and respect, addressing bullying/harassment, managing conflict, training employees, or coaching leaders we have the expertise and knowledge to partner with businesses to create strong and healthy employees.  When employees thrive, businesses succeed.

That’s also why we work closely with Respect Group and agreed to step up in Alberta to provide a learning opportunity for organizations and employees to address issues focused on psychological health and safety and civility and respect.

Who Should Attend?

Sessions will benefit:

  • Senior HR Professionals
  • Senior Occupational Health and Safety Professionals
  • Union Representatives
  • Municipalities
  • Business Leaders
  • Educational Institutions
  • Non profits

Why Should I Attend?

By attending you will:

  • Understand what your duty is as an employer to address the OHS issues and their impact on psychological health and safety.
  • Walk away with a road map of what your organization needs to do to create or improve upon a psychologically healthy workplace
  • Receive compliance and risk reduction ideas and solutions that can be easily implemented within your organization.
  • Be able to build a business case, determine your organizations return on investment and successfully position the importance and value within your organization
  • Hear from other leading organizations as they share their experiences regarding challenges and successes in creating psychologically healthy workplaces.

 

What’s my Investment?

Your investment will provide on-going value for yourself and your organization.  Ticket prices are deliberately kept low to ensure that we are able to support all participants.

 

Sales are limited so act soon!

Regular – $199

Group Rate – 35% off regular price for groups of 4 or more

 

Purchase your tickets HERE

 

Where will the learning happen?

Join us in Calgary, Alberta on January 29, 2020 at the historic Grand Theater.  An appropriate setting to engage participants to be creative, join in the facilitated discussions of the day and experience new learning.

608 1st St. SW    Calgary Alberta

Conveniently located just off the C-Train Line
Available Parking – James Short Parkade 115 4th Ave SW, Indigo Parkade at Centre Street – North of 7th Ave SW

What does the Day Look Like?

For Detailed Session Information click here.

8:30-9:00 Registration

9:00-9:15 Intro & Opening Remarks – Sheldon Kennedy – The Human Cost of Psychological Health and Safety

9:15-10:15 Fireside Chat – Psychological Health and Safety – Where are we now? 

10:15-10:30 Networking Break

10:30-12:00 Morning Breakout Sessions

  1. How can we position our people and organization’s culture to always place RESPECT first in everything we do?
  2. Developing a Roadmap to Create a Psychological Safe Workplace

12:00-1:00 Lunch

1:00-2:15  ROI and Building the Business Case – Sharing Resources

2:15-2:30 Networking Break

2:30-3:45 Afternoon Breakout Sessions – Sharing the Journey to Psychological Health & Safety

  • Non-Profit: Calgary Drop-In Centre
  • Municipality: City of Lethbridge
  • Union: TBD

3:45-4:00 Wrap-up

4:00-5:00 Join us in the Mezzanine for networking after conference

 

Who will be joining us?

For Speaker Bio’s click here.

Sheldon Kennedy – Internationally known Abuse Prevention Advocate

Dr. Pat Ferris – International Bullying/Harassment Expert, researcher and social worker focused on the treatment of bullying/harassment targets

Wayne McNeil – – Co-founder Respect Group and Canadian Red Cross Caring Award Recipient

Cameron Mitchell – President Kasa Consulting , Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) representative, Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP) and certified COR auditor

Blaine Donais – Present and Founder of the Workplace Fairness Institute, workplace conflict management specialist and author of Workplaces that Work, Engaging Unionized Employees and The Art & Science of Workplace Mediation.

Brad Blaisdell – Western Regional Director of the Respect in the Workplace Program at Respect Group

Danica Kelly – Eastern Regional Director of the Respect in the Workplace Program at Respect Group

Michelle Phaneuf – Partner Workplace Fairness West, certified Psychological Health and Safety Adviser and experienced workplace restoration expert.

Sandra Clarkson – Executive Director of the Calgary Drop-In Centre

Barb Neckich – Senior Human Resources Consultant, City of Lethbridge

Respect Group and Workplace Fairness Action Summit: The Intersection of Psychological Health & Safety and Civility & Respect

October 24th, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

 

 

 

Is your organization at a loss as how to address psychological health and safety or challenged with Alberta’s new Occupation Health and Safety (OHS) code?  We are bringing support.  Join us for the day to get insight into this complex issue and take away real tools you can immediately apply in your workplace.   This Action Summit will examine the intersection of Psychological Health and Safety and Civility & Respect.

Sessions will benefit Senior HR Professionals, Senior Occupational Health and Safety Professionals, and those leading Municipalities, Businesses, Unions, Educational Institutions and Non profits.

By attending you will:

  • Understand what your duty is as an employer to address the OHS issues and their impact on psychological health and safety.
  • Walk away with a road map of what your organization needs to do to create or improve upon a psychologically healthy workplace
  • Receive compliance and risk reduction ideas and solutions that can be easily implemented within your organization.
  • Be able to build a business case, determine your organizations return on investment and successfully position the importance and value within your organization
  • Hear from other leading organizations as they share their experiences regarding challenges and successes in creating psychologically health workplaces.

 

More details on the day including a full agenda can be found here: https://workplacefairnesswest.ca/detailed-session-information/

 

 

Preventing BAHD Behaviours in your Workplace

August 21st, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

In Partnership with the National Golf Course Owners Association Canada (NGCOA)
Source: 
Golf Business Canada Fall 2019

Authors: Brad Blaisdell & Michelle Phaneuf

Brad is the Regional Director – Respect in the Workplace for Respect Group which focuses on the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination. Michelle is a partner with Workplace Fairness West and the Workplace Fairness Institute. Contact Brad at bblaisdell@respectgroupinc.com and Michelle at phaneuf@workplacefairnesswest.ca.

Workplaces are complex, dynamic environments. Like golf, to improve your overall game or operations you need to recognize and adjust your physical game, but also your mental game. Employers today recognize the value of a healthy workplace, and that psychological health and safety is AS important as physical health and safety.

How we work, who we are, our attitudes, and behaviour are diverse and unique. When everyone interacts respectfully this diversity fosters a robust workplace and an inviting operation for staff. However, without that foundation of respect, BAHD (Bullying, Abuse, Harassment & Discrimination) behaviours can creep in. According to the Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety these behaviours might look like:

Preventing BAHD Behaviours in your Workplace

  • Spreading malicious rumours, gossip, or
  • Excluding or isolating someone
  • Intimidating a
  • Undermining or deliberately impeding a person’s
  • Physically abusing or threatening
  • Making verbal or emails jokes that are ‘obviously offensive’
  • Yelling or using
  • Criticizing a person persistently or
  • Belittling a person

 
If left unchecked, BAHD can turn an otherwise healthy workplace into a toxic environment and the cost of doing nothing adds up quickly.

THE COST OF DOING NOTHING

3 in 10 Canadians say their workplaces are not psychologically safe and healthy1, and nearly half report having experienced one or more acts of workplace harassment at least once a week for the last six months.2 Employees coping with these toxic work environments take twice as much sick time.3 Statistics Canada estimates the cost of employee absence due to bullying and harassment is roughly $19 billion per year.

Toxic workplaces not only affect employee absence but also impact productivity and efficiency. 80% of employees in toxic workplaces spend significant time and energy focused on the BAHD behaviour taking time away from their work and 48% reduce their effort.4 Considering an annual wage of $60,000, an example of 20% reduction in productivity can equate to a $12,000 loss per employee. This can have a significant financial impact on organizations of all sizes.

KPMG’s Diversity and Inclusion Group recently hosted a panel event in Toronto to discuss the issues around workplace bullying and harassment. Their panel included:

Louise Bradley, president and CEO, Mental Health Commission of Canada, Pamela Jeffery, president, The Pamela Jeffery Group, Soula Courlas, partner, KPMG, and Sheldon Kennedy, former NHL player, abuse survivor and co-founder of the Respect Group.

The panellists noted that ignoring the issue not only affects employee retention, but it hurts productivity and profitability.5 Experiencing bullying and harassment in the workplace can trigger mental health problems and illnesses, which, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, are the leading cause of short – and long – term disability.6 The economic burden in Canada has been estimated at $51 billion per year.

WHY SHOULD WE CARE?

Governments across Canada are recognizing the importance of psychological health and safety, and legislation is in effect to guide organizations to manage these issues. While legislation may differ from province to province, many have clear guidelines and expectations for employers.

Workers Compensation Boards are also accepting claims focused on psychological injuries including wording such as: clear and confirmed harassing behaviour at the workplace where a worker has been subjected to threats of harm, violations of personal privacy, public shaming or baseless threats to his or her employment status. Employers large and small have the duty to ensure their workplaces are harassment free and are exposing themselves to legal and financial risk if they do not address BAHD behaviours.

Sheldon Kennedy indicated in the panel discussion that, “Leaders and operators need to ask the tough questions to determine if this type of behaviour is happening in their organization. They need to be prepared for what they might find and be committed to taking action to address and end it.”

WHAT CAN WE DO?

A shocking 55% of surveyed Canadians reported experiencing bullying in the workplace, including name-calling, physical aggression and online taunts, according to a 2018 poll by Forum Research. Worse still, the study found that only one third of companies took action to stop the perpetrators. While pointing out the risks of not addressing the issue, the panellists noted that many organizations are taking real action to address the issue. “This isn’t just about focusing on the bad individuals,” said Kennedy. “Ninety-eight percent of individuals want to be good, so focus on them and give them the tools to be better.”

For those companies who don’t know where to start, the panellists said the most important step was instituting a culture of respect and zero tolerance for toxic behaviour in their organizations — a tone that needs to come straight from the golf course owner or operator, or general manager. “This will require a willingness from leadership to face the hard truths about what is happening inside their walls,” said Courlas. “Bullying can be subtle. Education is key to helping people recognize it. Leadership has a duty to proactively work towards eradicating this type of behaviour, which will inevitably help unlock the best of their people. Making good people better is the end goal and is completely attainable.”

WorkSafe BC has created guidelines to support employers in responding effectively:

ENCOURAGE everyone at the workplace to act towards others in a respectful and professional manner.

HAVE a workplace policy in place that includes a reporting system.

EDUCATE everyone that bullying is a serious matter.

TRY TO WORK OUT solutions before the situation gets serious or “out of control.”

EDUCATE everyone about what is considered bullying, and whom they can go to for help.

TREAT all complaints seriously, and deal with complaints promptly and confidentially.

TRAIN supervisors and managers in how to deal with complaints and potential situations. Encourage them to address situations promptly whether or not a formal complaint has been filed.

HAVE an impartial third party help with the resolution, if necessary.

They recommend that organizations act as soon as possible, not ignore any potential problems and not delay resolution.

Employers large and small must implement procedures for responding to reports or incidents of bullying and harassment. The procedures must ensure a reasonable response to the report or incident and aim to fully address the incident and ensure that bullying and harassment is prevented or minimized in the future. Investigations into the incident may be required or an impartial third party may be a resource for resolving the situation or restoring the workplace after an investigation has taken place.

In addition to clear policies and procedures, other best practices include a no-reprisals policy, confidential whistleblower lines, a workplace Ombudsman and due diligence on new hires.

HOW CAN WE BE PROACTIVE?

Thankfully, today’s work climate is changing. Top organizations are less reactive and more proactive than ever before. Employee wellness has become a priority because happy, engaged employees are more productive, collaborative, and innovative and will be much more client focused. Meeting and exceeding client expectations is next to impossible if trust between co- workers is broken, they are not engaged, appreciated, or acknowledged for the good work they do.

According to Wayne McNeil, co-founder of Respect Group, “Polices and procedures are necessary, but they typically sit on the shelf until an issue arises. You really do need to have proactive training that creates standards, empowers the bystander and refers to the policies/procedures. Ultimately, your risk mitigation strategy needs to be in sync with your desire to drive a positive culture.”

He indicates that this message needs to come from leadership. It can start with HR professionals saying that they need to be proactive; they can plant the seed. But the tone of the culture, the commitment and the accountability must be set by senior leadership.

Blaine Donais, president and founder of the Workplace Fairness Institute says, “Unresolved conflict is one of the top 5 indicators of bullying and harassment. Organizations need to ensure that employees have options to successfully resolve conflict. We have found that instituting a Workplace Ombudsman Office provides employees with a safe, confidential space to support in the resolution of conflict.”

Bullying, Abuse, Harassment, and Discrimination can be successfully addressed when it appears, and golf course course owners and operators can take steps to be proactive in preventing these behaviours. These steps will help your organization to create an environment in which employees can be successful, thereby ensuring your operation’s success.

 

ENDNOTES:

(1)www.reuters.com/article/us-work-mentalhealth/three-in-10-workers-say-workplace-not-psychologically-safe- idUSBRE82D0LF20120314

(2) www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/75-006-x/2018001/article/54982-eng.htm

(3)www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/sites/default/files/february_workplace_webinar.pdf

(4) https://hbr.org/2018/07/do-your-employees-feel-respected

(5 )www.cos-mag.com: Addressing workplace bullying, harassment must be a business priority, Panel January 31st, 2019

(6)www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/sites/default/files/february_workplace_webinar.pdf

 

 

Strategic alliance formed to support ‘Keeping Respect Alive’ in Canadian workplaces, WFI, workplace fairness institute, alberta, sheldon kennedy, respect, Workplace abuse, healthy workplaces, psychologically safe workplaces, workplace abuse, abuse prevention, harassment prevention training

Strategic alliance formed to support ‘Keeping Respect Alive’ in Canadian workplaces

May 14th, 2019 Press Releases, Respect in the Workplace

 

We are excited to announce a partnership between Respect Group and The Workplace Fairness Institute. Respect Group, a forward-thinking organization founded by former NHLer turned victims’ rights crusader Sheldon Kennedy delivers web-based training to organizations to equip employees with the education and skills needed to address bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) in the workplace. Workplace Fairness provides services to Respect Group certified organizations to support them with the next steps of “Keeping Respect Alive”.

“We believe in Keeping Respect Alive and we know that our Respect in the Workplace on-line training is the first step in starting the conversation.  We have partnered with the Workplace Fairness Institute because keeping that workplace conversation going is greatly enhanced through the support of a third party.” says Sheldon Kennedy, Co-Founder of Respect Group. “We see this as an optimal collaboration to further support organizations.”

Respect Group’s highly interactive, foundational training establishes a baseline of knowledge for employees with regards to bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) and is having a significant impact in workplaces across the country.  Working from this baseline the Workplace Fairness Institute brings their suite of facilitation, coaching and mediation services to imbed respectful behaviours by building capacity to manage conflict, increase collaboration and effectively implement change.

“We support organizations to foster a healthy culture based on a core value of equity of concern and respect,” says Blaine Donais, President and Founder of the Workplace Fairness Institute. “We are thrilled to be supporting Sheldon and Respect Group to provide people and organizations with fair, effective and sustainable solutions for resolving and managing workplace conflicts. We hold the common belief that psychological health and safety is important for every employee. ”

By joining forces, Workplace Fairness and Respect Group can support organizations to identify BAHD behaviours, address issues underlying these behaviours and empower employees to speak out to ensure a psychologically safe workplace.

About Workplace Fairness

The Workplace Fairness Institute (www.workplacefairness.ca) and their partner, Workplace Fairness West (www.workplacefairnesswest.ca) focus on supporting organizations to create safe workplaces.  Working with their over 150 certified Fairness Analysts across Canada they support organizations to enhance and build strong conflict management systems that involve and engage employees.  Their conflict resolution professionals have solid expertise in areas of facilitation, coaching, mediation and providing Ombuds services.

About Respect Group Inc.

Respect Group (respectgroupinc.com) was incorporated in 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of over 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect. As Canada’s leading on-line provider of prevention education related to BAHD, Respect Group has certified over 1.2 Million Canadians involved in sport, schools and the workplace. Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation (bcorporation.net).

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The Grand Joins The Movement With Respect Group Inc.

January 22nd, 2019 Respect in the Workplace

Jan 22, 2019, 08:00 ET

 

CALGARY – JANUARY 22, 2019/ – The Grand in Calgary Canada announced today that it will become the first arts organization in North America to become Respect Certified. The Grand has Joined the Movement with Respect Group, a forward-thinking organization founded by former NHLer turned victims’ rights crusader Sheldon Kennedy to deliver training to equip employees with the education and skills needed to prevent bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) in the workplace.

 

“Programs are one thing, making them a requirement for all members of the organization is about leadership and accountability,” said Sheldon Kennedy, Co-Founder of Respect Group. “Congratulations to the Grand for moving how we treat one another from the Policy category to the Priority category!”

“We at The GRAND are thrilled to be collaborating with Sheldon Kennedy and the Respect Group to help our theatre enhance its workplace culture, not only to eliminate unacceptable behaviours, but to create a positive and supportive environment that unlocks the diverse skills and ideas of our most valuable asset – our people.” – Tony McGrath, Chief Executive Officer, The Grand.

 

About The Grand

The Grand is situated on the land where the Bow River meets the Elbow River. The traditional Blackfoot name of this place is Mohkinstsis, which is also referred to as the City of Calgary. We honour and acknowledge Mohkinstsis and the traditional Treaty 7 territory and oral practices of the Blackfoot confederacy: Siksika, Kainai, Piikani as well as the Iyarhe Nakoda and Tsuut’ina nations who also call this place home.  We also acknowledge that this territory is home to the Métis Nation of Alberta, Region 3 within the historical Northwest Métis homeland.

The Grand is a not-for-profit organization (Charitable Registration: 134483981 RR0001). Since 2006, the theatre has been a centre for creation and presentation of contemporary performance from Calgary, Canada, and around the world. In 2019, we embark on a new chapter with a new vision for the future.

 

About Respect Group Inc.

Respect Group (respectgroupinc.com) was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of over 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect. As Canada’s leading on-line provider of prevention education related to BAHD, Respect Group has certified over 1.2 Million Canadians involved in sport, schools and the workplace. Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation (bcorporation.net).

 

For further information: media@respectgroupinc.com

KPMG in Canada joins forces with Respect Group Inc., Kpmg, respect, workplace abuse, work bullying, bullying prevention, online training,

KPMG in Canada joins forces with Respect Group Inc.

January 15th, 2019 Press Releases, Respect in the Workplace

NEWS PROVIDED BY

KPMG LLP 

Jan 15, 2019, 08:00 ET

Strategic alliance formed to create respectful, healthy and safe workplaces

TORONTOJan. 15, 2019 /CNW/ – KPMG in Canada announced today that it has joined forces with Respect Group, a forward-thinking organization founded by former NHLer turned victims’ rights crusader Sheldon Kennedy to deliver training to organizations to equip employees with the education and skills needed to prevent bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) in the workplace. Together, KPMG and Respect Group will provide companies with a leading-edge training curriculum that addresses the evolving needs of the #MeToo era.

“By joining forces with KPMG we elevate the potential to really change culture, not just push for compliance. This alliance and our collaborative approach to creating more respectful workplaces allows organizations to move from policy to making this a priority,” says Sheldon Kennedy, Co-Founder of Respect Group. “I am excited to keep moving the bar alongside KPMG!”

The curriculum begins with a foundational, online ‘Respect in the Workplace’ certification for employees before shifting to customized, client-specific, on-site workshops that build awareness and knowledge, followed by ongoing ‘Lunch & Learns’ to provide employees with the skills needed to contribute to a respectful workplace.

“Enabling organizations to build and sustain respectful cultures and mentally healthy workplaces are key priorities for us at KPMG,” says Soula Courlas, Partner and National Leader for People & Change Advisory Services. “We are thrilled to be collaborating with Sheldon and Respect Group to help businesses enhance their workplace cultures, not only to eliminate unacceptable behaviours, but to create positive and supportive environments that unlock the diverse skills and ideas of their most valuable asset – their people. We truly look forward to making a positive impact on workplaces across the country through this practical and powerful service offering.”

By joining forces, KPMG in Canada and Respect Group will begin to change workplace cultures by helping companies on their journey to prevent BAHD, empower the bystander and create a psychologically safe workplace.

About KPMG in Canada

KPMG LLP, an Audit, Tax and Advisory firm (kpmg.ca) is a limited liability partnership, established under the laws of Ontario, and the Canadian member firm of KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”). KPMG has over 7,000 professionals/employees in 38 locations across Canada serving private and public sector clients. KPMG is consistently recognized as an employer of choice and one of the best places to work in the country.

The independent member firms of the KPMG network are affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss entity. Each KPMG firm is a legally distinct and separate entity, and describes itself as such.

About Respect Group Inc.

Respect Group (respectgroupinc.com) was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of over 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect. As Canada’s leading on-line provider of prevention education related to BAHD, Respect Group has certified over 1.2 Million Canadians involved in sport, schools and the workplace. Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation (bcorporation.net).

SOURCE KPMG LLP

For further information: Danica Kelly, dkelly@respectgroupinc.com

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