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Our Mission

Empowering people to recognize and prevent bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) through interactive, online training courses.Harassment Prevention Training

Our Vision

Eliminate bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD) by inspiring a global culture of respect.

Canadians Respect Certified

Respect Group is a Certified B Corporation. B Corps are companies that use business as a force for good, aspiring to solve social and environmental problems. Becoming a B Corp was important to us in order to share our business values with our clients and employees so that, together, we can all be proud.

All bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination online prevention training courses that are delivered and produced by Respect Group have been approved and certified by Respect Education, an educational offering of the Canadian Red Cross.

Respect Group is proud to give-back +10% of our annual revenue to not-for-profit organizations across Canada.

The Respect Platform Advantage

FAQ

Frequently asked questions about accessing our programs, how to log in, obtaining your certificate, or what to do in the event you witness bullying, abuse, harassment or discrimination.

Why Respect Matters

People want to be involved with organizations that demonstrate Respect. Often, Vision or Mission Statements include the word “Respect” however, few organizations have empowered and equipped ALL members of their team with the necessary tools and training to ensure a positive and psychologically safe environment.

Contact Us

Respect Group takes your privacy seriously. By submitting a request for information by email to a general or specific Respect Group email address, you are consenting to have a representative of Respect Group contact you by email.                   

About Us

Respect Group was incorporated on April 5th, 2004 by co-founders, Sheldon Kennedy and Wayne McNeil, to pursue their common passion: the prevention of bullying, abuse, harassment and discrimination (BAHD). Respect Group is made up of a team of 30 talented individuals whose passion is to create a global culture of Respect.

We have enlisted pre-eminent experts to develop a best in class curriculum and e-learning platform. Expert content and a professional online training and certification model round out Respect Group’s fully outsourced risk management behaviour-change solutions for sport, schools and the workplace.

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Wayne McNeil

Wayne McNeil was Trustee and Vice-Chairman of the Rocky View School Division, volunteer President of the Sheldon Kennedy Foundation, which raised over $1.2 Million during the 1998 Cross-Canada Skate to raise awareness for the prevention of child abuse, served as Chairman of the Alberta Gymnastics Federation for six years andserved for 6 years as founding Board member of the Calgary and Area Child Advocacy Centre.

These volunteer roles and his commitment to child advocacy lead Wayne to co-found Respect Group Inc.; Canada’s first, on-line, abuse, discrimination, bullying and harassment prevention training program for community/sport organizations, schools and corporations.

Wayne has a seasoned, professional background in Information Technology and Project Management that he developed through key global positions with Bell Canada, 3Com Corporation and Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). This strong IT expertise enabled Wayne to create a solid team and technology approach for Respect Group. Wayne was instrumental in forging an exclusive partnership with the Canadian Red Cross to combine Canada’s best abuse, bullying and harassment prevention curriculum (Respect Education) with Respect Group ‘s world-class, on-line training technology.

In 2007, Wayne was awarded the Canadian Red Cross Caring Award for his leadership in the promotion of violence and abuse prevention education.

Wayne McNeil   

Co-founder

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Sheldon Kennedy

 

Sheldon Kennedy won a Memorial Cup, World Junior Gold Medal and skated for three teams in his eight-year NHL career. He is best known for his courageous decision to charge his Major Junior Hockey league coach with sexual assault for the abuse he suffered over a five year period while a teenager under his care. Through this disclosure, and the important work that Sheldon continues to do, he has become an inspiration to millions of abuse survivors around the world.

 

Sheldon has been instrumental in bringing governments, public and private sector partners together to work collaboratively to influence policy change and improve the way child abuse is handled. He has influenced changes in Canadian law and has taken his message to the International Olympic Committee and the US Senate.

 

Sheldon was Co-Founder of the Calgary Child Advocacy Centre, the first-of-its-kind in Canada, offering full wrap-around services for victims of child abuse. He is also the Co-Founder of Respect Group, which provides empowering online abuse, bullying and harassment prevention education to sport organizations, schools and the workplace.

 

Sheldon’s awareness contributions are many:

  • He in-line skated across Canada in 1998 to highlight the issue of child abuse and donated 100% of the proceeds ($1.2M) towards abuse prevention programs. During this skate he was presented with the keys to the cities of Ottawa, Toronto and Winnipeg.
  • His life story was made into an Award Winning TV movie.
  • In 2006 he published “Why I Didn’t Say Anything”; a riveting account of the many psychological impacts of abuse.
  • He has shared his story through countless media appearances including Oprah, ABC’s Nightline, W-5, The Fifth Estate, and was named Canada’s newsmaker of the year in 1997.
  • In 2016, Swift Current the documentary featured Sheldon’s story, providing a startling and never before seen look at recovery from childhood sexual abuse trauma.

 

Sheldon has received several awards for his tireless work including:

  • Honorary Doctor of Laws, University of Regina, 2018
  • Hockey Canada Order of Merit, 2018
  • Honourary Bachelor of Business Administration, SAIT, 2016
  • Honourary Bachelor of Child Studies and Child and Youth Care, Mount Royal University, 2016
  • Member of The Order of Canada, 2015
  • Member of The Order of Manitoba, 2015
  • Alberta Order of Excellence 2016
  • Honourary Doctorate of Laws, University of Calgary, 2015
  • Lincoln Alexander Outstanding Leader Award, University of Guelph, 2015
  • The David Foster Foundation Humanitarian Award, 2014
  • Calgary Citizen of the Year 2013
  • Honourary Doctorate of Laws, University of the Fraser Valley, 2012
  • Scotiabank Humanitarian Award, 2012
  • Canadian Red Cross Caring Award, 2007

Sheldon Kennedy   

Co-Founder

What Our Clients Have To Say

University of Calgary is proud to be the first academic institution in Canada to launch the Respect in the Workplace Program.

We believe the benefits of a respectful workplace include improved team communication, enhanced organizational health, reduced absenteeism, and increased morale and productivity.

Respect in the Workplace is helping us build a stronger, more vibrant campus culture, where every member feels valued for their contributions

Dr. Elizabeth Cannon
President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Calgary

Obviously, super impressed with the program. Great to have it in such short bursts, and the app made it so convenient (I did most of it on my skytrain commute!).

The messages are varied and made to be relevant to the parents, somehow in a way that empowers them to take action. I never felt like I was being talked down to. Even having done many similar trainings, I learned new things, and felt more confident to take action.

It exceeded all my expectations, and quite honestly, it’s in my top online education programs of all time.

Kate Kloos
Manager, Coach Development, Viasport
The Respect in School program has had a lasting impression here at Moncton High School by empowering the bystander in the prevention of bullying, abuse and maltreatment.

The Respect in School program provides the user the skills to recognize, identify and report suspected abuse, bullying and maltreatment. Countless students reported and disclosed past abuse and bullying during the implementation of the program and most sought counselling for the first time.

The implementation of the Respect in School Program and sharing Sheldon Kennedy’s journey of hope and healing has been one of the most powerful things I have done in my sixteen-year teaching career.

Craig Eagles
Teacher, Moncton High School

Media

Law firm ordered to pay student nearly $70K for wrongful firing that led to her becoming homeless

Law firm ordered to pay student nearly $70K for wrongful firing that led to her becoming homeless

A prominent Vancouver law firm has been ordered to pay almost $70,000 for wrongfully dismissing an articling student, who ended up unemployed and homeless for several months after she was fired.

A B.C. Supreme Court justice found that Melissa Ojanen, who graduated from law school in 2016, was mistreated while working at Acumen Law Corporation.

She had been hired as an articling student in what was supposed to be a 12-month placement that included a 10-week professional legal training course.

“She is the victim of unfair, bullying, bad-faith conduct by her former employer and her former principal and has suffered substantial and prolonged emotional distress because of that conduct,” wrote Justice Geoffrey Gomery in the decision.

“The consequences for Ms. Ojanen were severe. She was unable to obtain alternate articles and has not been called to the bar.”

‘Unnecessary and psychologically brutal’

Acumen specializes in driving law. According to the judgment, Acumen founder Paul Doroshenko fired Ojanen publicly after discovering a blog about driving prohibitions that he believed she was running.

Doroshenko argued it was too similar to one the firm runs.

“Mr. Doroshenko’s response on discovering the blog was disproportionate and bullying,” Gomery wrote.

“I find that he was determined to protect Acumen’s competitive position by making an example of Ms. Ojanen.”

Paul Doroshenko, founder of Acumen, is a prominent defence lawyer in Vancouver. (CBC News)

Doroshenko accused the student of breach of contract, theft, trespassing and wrongful use of marketing materials belonging to the firm. The judge dismissed the allegations, noting they were “harsh and unwarranted.”

Gomery also noted the firm’s actions — including serving a lawsuit against Ojanen in front of her classmates, rather than mailing it to her — was “unnecessary and psychologically brutal.”

After she was fired, Ojanen struggled to find employment and pay rent, according to the ruling.

She lived out of her car for three months — and when her husband, whom she is separated from, repossessed the vehicle, she briefly lived on the streets before her parents took her in.

“Pending the resolution of this lawsuit, her life has been on hold,” wrote Gomery.

Ojanen was awarded $50,000 for aggravated damages, as well as ordinary damages of $18,934 for lost wages.

Never too busy for investigations If employers can’t find time to investigate harassment, they’ll pay damages later

Never too busy for investigations If employers can’t find time to investigate harassment, they’ll pay damages later

Source: Occupational Health and Safety 

By: Jeffrey R. Smith

It can be busy to run a company and manage employees. At times, most business owners and managers probably feel it’s almost impossible to juggle all the things being asked of them. However, regardless of how busy things are, they can’t use it as an excuse not to properly investigate allegations of workplace harassment or bullying.

All employers in Canada have a legal obligation to properly and fairly investigate allegations of harassment, bullying and violence in the workplace. After all, they are also legally required to provide a workplace free of such threats, so when the possibility of any of these things occurring is raised, they need to find out if it happened and if it did, take measures to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

It’s a human rights matter, a health and safety matter, and a workplace culture matter.

Unfortunately, proper investigations don’t always happen. This is evident in the numerous employment law cases involving alleged workplace harassment, bullying, and violence that were deemed not to have been properly resolved by the employers involved. And usually this means the employer must pay.

The Ontario Superior Court recently heard a case where an employee made a formal complaint that a co-worker verbally harassed her on multiple occasions, including yelling and screaming at her and calling her an idiot. The president of the company acknowledged her complaint, but said they were currently short-staffed due to illnesses and vacation, so he would pass it along to the HR department.

However, no-one did anything over the ensuing month, and the employee complained again that her co-worker continued to yell at her and insult her, saying she was at her “wit’s end.” Still, nothing was done.

One month after the employee’s second complaint and two months after her initial complaint, the employee claimed the co-worker slapped her across the face three times. She reported this to the employer and filed a police report, but her employment was terminated the same day after 19 years of service.

Not surprisingly, the employee won a claim of wrongful dismissal and the employer was ordered to compensate her for lost pay in lieu of reasonable notice. The court also found the employer was guilty of bad-faith conduct when it failed to investigate the employee’s harassment complaints or discipline her abusive co-worker, terminated her as a reprisal for her complaints, and didn’t provide her with her statutory entitlements upon termination.

This warranted an extra $50,000 in aggravated damages, for a total award of more than $194,000.

It’s likely that when the company president in the above case received the employee’s complaint, it was the last thing he wanted to have to deal with, and he most likely felt he didn’t have time to deal with it. But it doesn’t really matter, because he legally had to deal with it. Failing to prioritize the complaint and not getting around to investigating it spelled trouble in the end for the employer — trouble that was compounded when the employer dismissed the employee rather than deal with her continuing complaints.

The employee already was entitled to a good amount of common law reasonable notice, with 19 years of service, but the aggravated damages just piled on the high cost of the employer’s poor handling of the affair.

It’s not a good idea to push workplace harassment complaints to the side. If a company doesn’t have time to address them, then it’s going to have to make time to write some big cheques later.

Workplace harassment on the agenda as Canadian police chiefs meet in Calgary

Workplace harassment on the agenda as Canadian police chiefs meet in Calgary

SOURCE: Global News The Canadian Press

 

How to deal with bullying and harassment in the workplace is to be discussed as Canada’s police chiefs gather in Alberta for their annual meeting.

The conference of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police in Calgary has attracted 425 delegates and is to address a number of human resources issues, including how to create a safer and healthier environment for employees.

The RCMP recently settled class-action lawsuits that will pay out millions to compensate for discrimination, bullying and harassment of female employees over the last 45 years.

 

Similar concerns have been expressed by female officers in Calgary, which prompted a review of the force’s human resources branch.

“Obviously the topic is right on point. We’ve brought speakers in from all over the world to speak on these types of issues,” Calgary police Chief Mark Neufeld told a news conference Monday.

“We’ve got lots of work to do and … as our environment changes and as society changes we will continue to have work. The work we’re talking about here I don’t think will ever be done.”

 

Association president, Vancouver police Chief Adam Palmer, said harassment exists in many different professions, but none has the same level of scrutiny as law enforcement.

“We’re always under the microscope for everything we do … rightfully so because we have extraordinary powers in society and everything that we’re doing tends to come to the forefront more than other occupations.”

Lessons learned from the RCMP lawsuits are likely to be discussed at the three-day conference, Palmer said.

“Nobody is doing this perfectly and there’s no magic bullet that anyone’s found.”

Palmer added that attitudes are changing as an increasing number of veteran officers continue to retire.

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Sexual harassment training, Workplace harassment training, Workplace misconduct training, Workplace incivility, Incivility in the Workplace, Workplace bullying, sensitivity training, discrimination staff training, inclusive workplace training, workplace diversity training, inclusive / diverse workplace, How to create a strong culture and environment of inclusiveness? How to address workplace discrimination, bullying & harassment, How to provide employees with skills and tools to minimize hostility in the workplace? How to create a positive workplace? How can I teach my employees to respect our code of conduct? How can I bring my employees to the same page regarding accurate? What can you do as a manager to avoid harassment or bullying? Bill 168 training Ontario, Bill 132 training Ontario

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